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The Angus Conversation cover art

The Angus Conversation

There are some pasture chats or bull sale discussions that are just too good to keep to ourselves. In this Angus Journal podcast, we’ll bring you interesting and entertaining chats with fellow breeders, researchers, marketers and more. Keep up on all things Angus. Be part of the conversation.

Latest Episode

Famous Bulls, an Angus Library and U.S. Presidents With Angus Connections — Tom Burke’s Top 10

What do you get when you combine a lifetime as a student of the Angus breed with more than a half of a century of collecting Angus memorabilia? The only logical answer is Tom Burke and his American Angus Hall of Fame in Smithfield, Mo. In this episode, Tom selects his top 10 favorite items in the collection and tells stories on everything from the early years of the Angus Journal to the time he personally knew both the sitting U.S. president and vice president.    HOSTS: Mark McCully and Miranda Reiman    GUESTS: Tom Burke is a fourth-generation Angus breeder and an owner of the original Burke Farm located in southeastern Minnesota.  Burke has spent more than 50 years of his life traveling the country as a sale manager for the American Angus Hall of Fame, which is also home to the world’s largest collection of Angus memorabilia.  Among his many accolades, USA Today named him “America’s Most Traveled Person” in 1993. Burke served on the American Angus Association Board of Directors from 2013 to 2016, and in 2017 was inducted into the Saddle & Sirloin Portrait Gallery, which is considered one of the highest honors in the livestock industry. Today, Burke owns 200 registered Angus cows and has co-authored 11 Angus books. RELATED CONTENT:  Purchase the barn book, “Sheltering Generations” here: https://shop.certifiedangusbeef.com/products/sheltering-generations-the-american-barn To find the American Angus Hall of Fame, visit their website: https://www.angushall.com/index.html Saddle and Sirloin Honors Tom Burke SPONSOR NOTE:  At Ingram Angus near Pulaski, Tenn., they have a code for doing business,  "Integrity is what we stand by: good quality people who deal with good quality cattle.” Learn more about their program at IngramAngus.com. The whole Ingram crew wants to wish all the juniors good luck at their shows this summer.  Don't miss news in the Angus breed. Visit www.AngusJournal.net and subscribe to the AJ Daily e-newsletter and our monthly magazine, the Angus Journal.

May 21

Episodes

Famous Bulls, an Angus Library and U.S. Presidents With Angus Connections — Tom Burke’s Top 10 cover art

Famous Bulls, an Angus Library and U.S. Presidents With Angus Connections — Tom Burke’s Top 10

What do you get when you combine a lifetime as a student of the Angus breed with more than a half of a century of collecting Angus memorabilia? The only logical answer is Tom Burke and his American Angus Hall of Fame in Smithfield, Mo. In this episode, Tom selects his top 10 favorite items in the collection and tells stories on everything from the early years of the Angus Journal to the time he personally knew both the sitting U.S. president and vice president.    HOSTS: Mark McCully and Miranda Reiman    GUESTS: Tom Burke is a fourth-generation Angus breeder and an owner of the original Burke Farm located in southeastern Minnesota.  Burke has spent more than 50 years of his life traveling the country as a sale manager for the American Angus Hall of Fame, which is also home to the world’s largest collection of Angus memorabilia.  Among his many accolades, USA Today named him “America’s Most Traveled Person” in 1993. Burke served on the American Angus Association Board of Directors from 2013 to 2016, and in 2017 was inducted into the Saddle & Sirloin Portrait Gallery, which is considered one of the highest honors in the livestock industry. Today, Burke owns 200 registered Angus cows and has co-authored 11 Angus books. RELATED CONTENT:  Purchase the barn book, “Sheltering Generations” here: https://shop.certifiedangusbeef.com/products/sheltering-generations-the-american-barn To find the American Angus Hall of Fame, visit their website: https://www.angushall.com/index.html Saddle and Sirloin Honors Tom Burke SPONSOR NOTE:  At Ingram Angus near Pulaski, Tenn., they have a code for doing business,  "Integrity is what we stand by: good quality people who deal with good quality cattle.” Learn more about their program at IngramAngus.com. The whole Ingram crew wants to wish all the juniors good luck at their shows this summer.  Don't miss news in the Angus breed. Visit www.AngusJournal.net and subscribe to the AJ Daily e-newsletter and our monthly magazine, the Angus Journal.

May 21
The Truth Must Be Discovered: McCulloh on Data, Validation and Authenticity cover art

The Truth Must Be Discovered: McCulloh on Data, Validation and Authenticity

When Brian McCulloh found himself in Viroqua, Wis., in 1984 to manage and grow the Angus herd at Woodhill Farms, he knew he’d be learning as he went. In the decades that followed, Brian used that as a personal motto of sorts, always drawing on his curiosity and need for answers to make improvements. Early on he selected the type of cattle he wanted to create and then stayed focused on that for his entire career, building a legacy Angus brand with his program as a result. Brian says the key has been avoiding distractions, believing in the data and then following the plan. This episode covers everything from his early years to whether it’s easier or harder today and even the story of why he decided it was time for a new chapter.   HOSTS: Mark McCully and Miranda Reiman    GUESTS: Brian McCulloh was an Iowa farm boy who enjoyed showing and judging cattle in 4-H. He was on the judging team at Iowa State University and graduated with a degree in agriculture finance. McCulloh spent a short time as Activities Director at the American Angus Association before he and his young family headed to Wisconsin to pursue an opportunity to raise Angus cattle. They’ve been there ever since. Woodhill Farms, operated in partnership with Dan and Anne Borgen, received the Certified Angus Beef ® Commitment to Excellence award in 2000, and McCulloh received the Angus Heritage Award in 2020. He served on the American Angus Association Board of Directors and has been active in the Beef Improvement Federation. RELATED CONTENT: Stockmanship & Science 40 Years of Focus SPONSOR NOTE: Deer Valley Farms has brought back their Spring Cow Sale, and they invite you to join them this Saturday May 11th at 11 a.m. Come see the unique offering of 4- and 5-year-old donor cows and natural calving cows, along with a variety of bred heifers out of contemporary groups not typically featured. Don't miss news in the Angus breed. Visit www.AngusJournal.net and subscribe to the AJ Daily e-newsletter and our monthly magazine, the Angus Journal.

May 7 • 1h 9m
The Pratts: One Marriage, Two Kids, Three Moves and the Cow Herd that Pays Their Way cover art

The Pratts: One Marriage, Two Kids, Three Moves and the Cow Herd that Pays Their Way

Life isn’t always a direct line from A to B, and Jason and Paige Pratt found blessings abound in their journey. They detail the path that took them from the Appalachian foothills to the Kansas prairie and back again. They included lessons in generational transfer along the way. The couple shares what they expect from their cows, how they built their customer base and why they think it’s so important to get involved in organizations that will help them protect their way of life.   HOSTS: Mark McCully and Miranda Reiman     GUESTS: Jason and Paige Pratt and their family operate Pratt Cattle Co. near Akins, Va., with Jason’s parents C.W. and Shirley. When they married in 2011, they both brought cattle upbringings and advanced degrees in agriculture (Jason with his master's in ag business and Paige with her doctorate in animal breeding) to make their mark on the herd that had started as C.W.’s FFA project. They share responsibilities on the farm where their children Elizabeth and Garrett make up the next generation.   Related reading: Not Always Linear https://www.angus.org/ajarticlepdf/0124-Pratt%20cattle.pdf Don't miss news in the Angus breed. Visit www.AngusJournal.net and subscribe to the AJ Daily e-newsletter and our monthly magazine, the Angus Journal.

April 23 • 1h 6m 24s
A Show Project Gone Right: Byrds on California Ranching, Cattle That Feed and Grade, and Hosting a Sale in the Shadow of 9/11 cover art

A Show Project Gone Right: Byrds on California Ranching, Cattle That Feed and Grade, and Hosting a Sale in the Shadow of 9/11

Dan and Ty Byrd, Byrd Cattle Co., Red Bluff, Calif., say that the best grazing land in the United States comes with its own set of challenges. From the state’s political climate to other land uses threatening to shrink their customer base, they know providing good genetics is only half of the strategy to getting repeat customers. They’re active in marketing customer calves, too. The father-son duo shares their experience in growing from a show cattle project to selling commercial bulls in an operation that now also includes female and embryo sales. Tune in to hear about everything from where they were on 9/11 to how the work gets done on their multigenerational ranch. HOSTS: Mark McCully and Miranda Reiman  GUESTS: The father-son combo of Dan and Ty Byrd raise 350 registered Angus bulls in north-central California near the town of Red Bluff. Their customers are primarily commercial cow-calf producers in the Western states.   Dan and his wife, Chris, started the cattle operation decades ago. Their children Ty and Brooke were active in the National Junior Angus Association, showing across the country. Ty came back to the family ranch following a short stint in private industry out of college, and they changed up the business model to focus on selling bulls. Today, he and his wife are raising two children on the ranch. They host an annual bull sale in the spring and a female sale in the fall, and have added embryo sales in recent years.     Don't miss news in the Angus breed. Visit www.AngusJournal.net and subscribe to the AJ Daily e-newsletter and our monthly magazine, the Angus Journal.

April 9 • 1h 4m 5s
Create Your Type of Angus — Gabriel and Uhrig on Breeding Strategies, New Perspectives and Having a Voice cover art

Create Your Type of Angus — Gabriel and Uhrig on Breeding Strategies, New Perspectives and Having a Voice

HOSTS: Mark McCully and Miranda Reiman Friendships that form over Angus cattle are the type that stand the test of time. Hear from long-time friends and fellow South Dakota Angus breeders TJ Gabriel, Deep Creek Angus; and David Uhrig, Mt. Rushmore Angus, as they discuss what they’re asking their Angus cows to do. They talk maternal, terminal, weaning weights and calving ease, along with ways they’ve gotten involved with the breed at both at a regional and national level. GUESTS: TJ Gabriel and David Uhrig TJ Gabriel, his wife, Jeanine, and their family own and operate Deep Creek Angus. TJ’s great-great grandfather homesteaded near Midland, S.D., where they now have 250 registered Angus cows. They host a “Ranch Bred, Ranch Fed” production sale in Philip, S.D., each February and sell private treaty heifers in the fall. David Uhrig’s history in the Angus breed dates to his grandfather’s ranch in Nebraska. He went to the University of Nebraska and held various jobs before joining the Mt. Rushmore Angus crew in 2006. Today he manages the 500-cow Hermosa, S.D., ranch that’s owned by brothers Marty and Eddie Rypkema, and they have an annual production sale each February.  SPONSOR NOTE:  This episode is brought to you by CAM Ranches and Ogeechee Farms. To learn more about their April 13th Southern Synergy sale visit: www.southernsynergyangus.com  Don't miss news in the Angus breed. Visit www.AngusJournal.net and subscribe to the AJ Daily e-newsletter and our monthly magazine, the Angus Journal.

March 26 • 1h 10m 48s
A 365-Day Long Sale Day — Ellingsons on Creating Cows and Customer Service to Serve Commercial Cattlemen cover art

A 365-Day Long Sale Day — Ellingsons on Creating Cows and Customer Service to Serve Commercial Cattlemen

The Ellingson family knows consistency, in both cattle and customer interactions, plays a role in their success. Chad and Julie Ellingson, St. Anthony, N.D., have grown their family and their Angus herd in tandem, with that next generation now taking an active role in management and breeding decisions. This episode features the father-son duo of Chad and Stetson and covers how much emphasis to place on calving ease, creating a uniform calf crop, their favorite moment of sale day and much more.  HOSTS: Mark McCully and Miranda Reiman  GUESTS: Chad and Stetson Ellingson Chad and Julie (Schaff) Ellingson started Ellingson Angus in 1995 near St. Anthony, N.D., when they married and merged their registered Angus herds. Over the years, the Ellingsons have used artificial insemination (AI) and embryo transplant (ET) to expand their herd, taking advantage of the best genetics available. They strive to raise balanced-trait cattle that will perform well for their customers. The Ellingsons host a production sale the first Saturday in February at the sale facility on the ranch where they market yearling and age-advantaged Angus bulls and open and bred females. They also help market their customers’ thousands of feeder calves each year.  Chad and Julie have five children: Stetson, Jameson, Sierra, Medora and Sheridan. Stetson and Jameson returned to the family operation full-time after graduating college, and along with their brother-in-law Keenan Pierce, help operate the ranch.  This podcast is brought to you by Westway Feed Products. Visit westwayfeed.com for more information.   Don't miss news in the Angus breed. Visit www.AngusJournal.net and subscribe to the AJ Daily e-newsletter and our monthly magazine, the Angus Journal.

March 12 • 1h 9m 19s
In the Driver’s Seat: Schiefelbein, Leachman on Data, Game Changers and Angus Momentum cover art

In the Driver’s Seat: Schiefelbein, Leachman on Data, Game Changers and Angus Momentum

If a breed association “takes its eye off the ball” of making commercial cattlemen more profitable, it’s set to fail, says Donnie Schiefelbein, Kimball, Minn., Angus breeder. He joined breeder Lee Leachman for this episode that covers the changes in the Angus business over the decades, the data that has made a difference, and ways that coordination can produce solutions. The pair talks about the shift to grid marketing, and how to prioritize your cow herd while aiming for carcass quality.  HOSTS: Mark McCully and Miranda Reiman   GUESTS:  Don Schiefelbein, along with his seven brothers and three nephews, own and operate Schiefelbein Farms, Kimball, Minn., where the family manages more than 1,000 registered females, farms 4,600 acres and feeds out 7,500 head of cattle.  The operation was started in 1955 by his father, Frank, and before Don returned to the family farm he served as executive director of the American Gelbvieh Association. He previously worked for the North American Limousin Association after graduating from Texas A&M University.  Don has served the industry in numerous roles including American Angus Association president, National Cattlemen’s Beef Association (NCBA) president and Minnesota Cattlemen’s Association president. Lee Leachman is the CEO of Leachman Cattle of Colorado. He graduated from Harvard University with a degree in economics in 1988 and completed graduate-level work in animal breeding at Colorado State University.  Leachman Cattle markets more than 2,000 Angus, Red Angus, Stabilizer and Charolais bulls produced from a pool of 12,000 females in more than 45 cooperator herds. Selection objectives are largely based on the company’s proprietary indexes. The company’s flagship sale is hosted in March each year in Fort Collins, Colo.  Lee has been active in the industry through groups including the NCBA, various breed associations, and the Beef Improvement Federation, where he is a past president. Lee frequently speaks to cattlemen both in the United States and internationally.  Don't miss news in the Angus breed. Visit www.AngusJournal.net and subscribe to the AJ Daily e-newsletter and our monthly magazine, the Angus Journal.

February 27 • 1h 5m 32s
Cattle Feeders Share Their Wishlist, Predictions — Kee Jim and Mike Thoren Discuss Future cover art

Cattle Feeders Share Their Wishlist, Predictions — Kee Jim and Mike Thoren Discuss Future

The days of feed cards and calculators have given way to computer-balanced rations, mixed pens of cattle have become more uniform and carcass-based premiums are now figured into the target rather than an afterthought, but the main objectives of cattle feeders remain the same today as they were decades ago. Two well-known names in the cattle feeding business join us for this episode capturing their history, the kind of cattle they’re currently demanding and an outlook on the future of that segment of the industry. It covers everything from beef-on-dairy systems and roller compacted concrete to advice Angus breeders can take to heart. HOSTS: Mark McCully and Miranda Reiman GUESTS: Kee Jim, of G.K. Jim Farms and founding partner of Feedlot Health Management Services, hails from Okotoks, Alberta. After growing up on a ranch and the earning his degree from the Western College of Veterinary Medicine in Saskatchewan in 1983, he began his entrepreneurial and his feedyard consulting career in tandem, always looking to the data to answer the toughest questions. In addition, he feeds cattle across North America. Among the numerous accolades he’s received, Kee was recently inducted into the Cattle Feeders Hall of Fame. Mike Thoren has served as the president and CEO of Five Rivers since it began in 2005. Before that he held various roles for ConiBeef and Continental Grain Company, including CEO, feedyard general manager and feedlot operations. He earned a masters in ag economics and a bachelor’s in ag business from Washington State University.  This podcast is brought to you by Westway Feed Products. Visit westwayfeed.com for more information.   Don't miss news in the Angus breed. Visit www.AngusJournal.net and subscribe to the AJ Daily e-newsletter and our monthly magazine, the Angus Journal.

February 13 • 1h 4m 23s
Board Recap: National Cattle Evaluation Improvements, Parent Protocols, the Role of Angus in Herd Rebuilding and More cover art

Board Recap: National Cattle Evaluation Improvements, Parent Protocols, the Role of Angus in Herd Rebuilding and More

A state of constant improvement — if there was a phrase to sum up the work the American Angus Association Board did this week and the updates they heard from staff, that would be it. This episode focuses on “core” updates to the National Cattle Evaluation, a discussion around parentage protocols and a rundown of the genetic tools for commercial cattlemen (and their timeline for release). There are notes from each of the entities and the National Junior Angus Association (NJAA) board and an encouraging outlook for the year ahead.  HOSTS: Mark McCully and Miranda Reiman  GUESTS:   Barry Pollard, Enid, Okla., currently serves as the chairman of the American Angus Association Board of Directors. He attended Oklahoma State University (OSU), followed by medical school and serving as neurosurgeon, performing than 18,000 surgeries prior to his retirement. In addition to other agriculture business ventures, Pollard has built his Pollard Farms registered Angus operation to 400 Angus cows, selling around 150 bulls each year.  Jerry Theis, Leavenworth, Kan., is a second-generation Angus breeder. His parents established April Valley Farms in 1952 in the Salt Creek Valley. Theis graduated with his veterinary degree from Kansas State University in 1991, and still practices at a local clinic while he manages his family’s diversified operation. April Valley Farms was recognized as a Historic Angus Herd by the Association in 2019. Theis and his wife are active in the Kansas Angus Association, serving two terms as advisors for the National Junior Angus Association.  Kelli Retallick-Riley, president of Angus Genetics Inc., leads her team of research geneticists and customer service specialists to provide the best genetic and genomic tools and resources to Angus breeders and users of Angus genetics. Related reading: Find the full letter to membership following the meetings here.  Don't miss news in the Angus breed. Visit www.AngusJournal.net and subscribe to the AJ Daily e-newsletter and our monthly magazine, the Angus Journal.

February 9 • 49m 23s
Tiedeman on Cow Type, Making Change and Having Influence cover art

Tiedeman on Cow Type, Making Change and Having Influence

Listening to your commercial customers is one of the best ways to ensure success at meeting their demand, says Jake Tiedeman, Baldridge-Tiedeman Angus of North Platte, Neb. In this episode, he recalls what it was like to grow up as Jim Tiedeman’s sidekick and covers how his family works together today. Tiedeman talks tools for change, how to make sure you’re heard by your Association and gives a look at the future. As a bonus, there's some beef product talk and a history on the family’s famous Baldridge Seasoning.   HOSTS: Mark McCully and Miranda Reiman  GUEST: Jake Tiedeman, along with his wife Lindsay and parents Bob and Becky, operate Baldridge-Tiedeman Angus near North Platte, Neb. Longtime Angus breeders, Jake got his start by tagging along with his grandfather Jim and then purchasing some cattle of his own. Jake was involved in the National Junior Angus Association, where he served on the board and still counts many of those cohorts among his friends.   Related content:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X4WS-o2Rxv4 Don't miss news in the Angus breed. Visit www.AngusJournal.net and subscribe to the AJ Daily e-newsletter and our monthly magazine, the Angus Journal.

January 30 • 56m 35s
More Than Raising a Good One: Sawyer, Stevenson, Toledo Talk Customer Interaction and the Perfect Cow cover art

More Than Raising a Good One: Sawyer, Stevenson, Toledo Talk Customer Interaction and the Perfect Cow

Adam Sawyer, Doug Stevenson and John Toledo have more in common than the title of 2024 National Western Stock Show Angus Pen and Carload Show judge. During this episode you’ll hear what the trio thinks about the best way to create the right animal for the right time, how to get a little bit better every day and how it felt to wear that judge’s pin in Denver.    HOSTS: Mark McCully and Miranda Reiman GUESTS:  Adam Sawyer, A & B Cattle, Bassett, Neb., and his wife Jenessa work alongside Adam’s mom, Becky, to manage the family’s registered seedstock operation. They’re raising the next generation of Angus breeders, as their sons Augustus and Truett grow up in the Nebraska Sandhills. Doug Stevenson, Basin Angus Ranch, Reed Point, Mont., was active in the National Junior Angus Association and attended Montana State University before graduating from law school and returning to his family's ranch in the Judith Basin. In 2010, Doug and his wife, Sharon, and their three daughters, moved to eastern Montana, where today, along with their growing family, have various roles in Basin Angus. John Toledo, Tri-T Farms/Toledo Ranches, Vasilia, Calf., got his start in the Angus business through 4-H. On his family’s central California farm and ranch, he grew the herd, married his wife, Kelli (a fellow Angus junior), and they’re now raising their son in the breed.   Don't miss news in the Angus breed. Visit www.AngusJournal.net and subscribe to the AJ Daily e-newsletter and our monthly magazine, the Angus Journal.

January 16 • 56m 14s
Fish Farms, Male Fertility and Angus Cattle — Genetic Innovations of the Present and Future cover art

Fish Farms, Male Fertility and Angus Cattle — Genetic Innovations of the Present and Future

Could the epigenetics of a male sperm cell tell us anything about cow herd fertility? What advancements in the aquiculture industry could be applied to the beef business? Two scientists give an outside perspective on how technology is shaping improvements in everything from patient care to feeding a growing world population. They share challenges that sound familiar, such as barriers to data collection and applying genetic tools across diverse production environments. This episode is meant to stretch perspectives by showing what is, what could be, and cautions and encouragement for the future. HOSTS: Miranda Reiman and Kelli Retallick-Riley, president, Angus Genetics Inc. GUESTS: Debbie Plouffe, co-founder and vice president of business development-genetics for the Center for Aquaculture Technologies (CAT). The full-service R&D company helps improve productivity, efficiency, and sustainability in the aquaculture industry.  Debbie graduated with a bachelor's in invertebrate biology and a doctorate in physiology and cell biology from the University of Alberta, and she’s held leadership roles at the National Research Council (NRC) and AquaBounty Technologies. There she contributed to the regulatory approval of the world’s first genetically engineered food animal, the AquAdvantage salmon. She’s now based at CAT’s San Diego, Calif., office, working with collaborators across the globe on genetic improvement in fish.  Kristin Brogaard, chief scientific officer and co-founder of Inherent Biosciences, leads the design and execution studies that validate their products that focus on using epigenetic discoveries to answer unexplained medical conditions. Currently much of her work focuses on the DNA methylation patterns associated with male infertility. Kristin received her doctorate in molecular biology from Northwestern University, where she developed a novel epigenetic technology that allowed for single-base pair resolution mapping of DNA binding proteins genome-wide. She did postdoctoral work with Leroy Hood, a pioneer in personalized medicine technologies, and then served as director of program management for Arivale before joining Inherent Biosciences in 2019. Co-founding the startup allowed Kristin to combine her passion for epigenetics and personalized medicine to help put a stop to trail-and-error medical procedures.  Don't miss news in the Angus breed. Visit www.AngusJournal.net and subscribe to the AJ Daily e-newsletter and our monthly magazine, the Angus Journal.

December 19 • 58m 58s
Get More Bidders: Harsh, Long Say Sale Day Prep Starts Now cover art

Get More Bidders: Harsh, Long Say Sale Day Prep Starts Now

If there’s a day when you want everything to go right, it’s sale day. So, how far in advance should preparations start? Three months out? Six months? Will Harsh, regional manager for the American Angus Association, and sale manager Rance Long, Rance Long Inc., say it’s a year-round focus. Whether you’re looking to host your first bull or female sale or have been at it a while, this episode covers ways to manage the pre-sale to-do list, ways to get buyers in the seats, and making all the details “day of” run smoothly. With decades of combined experience, they share the secrets of sale day success.  HOSTS: Miranda Reiman and Clay Zwilling, president, Angus Media  GUESTS: Will Harsh, American Angus Association regional manager for Nebraska and Colorado, grew up on his family’s central Ohio farm. He graduated from Oklahoma State University in 2018, and served as a regional manager in Arkansas, Alabama, Louisiana and Mississippi before taking on his current post. Today, he serves Angus breeders as the regional manager for Nebraska and Colorado. Rance Long, Rance Long Inc., is a third-generation Angus breeder, and he and his wife are raising the fourth. An Indiana native, he attended Oklahoma State University and makes his living just down the road near Adair, Okla., today. He serves as a sale manager for breeders from across the country, helping them market their cattle and get the most for them.  Related reading: Plan Your Pathway to Sale Day Calculate the deadlines you need to hit to have a successful sale with the Sale Day Calculator.  This podcast is brought to you by Zoetis Genetics. Visit beefgenetics.com for more information.   Don't miss news in the Angus breed. Visit www.AngusJournal.net and subscribe to the AJ Daily e-newsletter and our monthly magazine, the Angus Journal.

December 5 • 55m 19s
‘We’ll Figure It Out’ — Bruner, Hall Jump Headfirst Into Direct-to-Consumer Beef Marketing cover art

‘We’ll Figure It Out’ — Bruner, Hall Jump Headfirst Into Direct-to-Consumer Beef Marketing

Sometimes the only way to start a new venture is to jump right in. That’s how Angus producers Lindsey Hall and Ashley Brunner say they approached their direct-to-consumer beef marketing enterprises they operate as part of their family Angus operations. Both operations have been among the first to test Certified Angus Beef’s (CAB) Ranch to Table program, and share how they got started, the power of partnerships and ways they keep their customers happy. And they’re not done yet. Tune in to hear what’s next and if this is an opportunity you might want to pursue in your own operation.  HOSTS: Miranda Reiman and Kara Lee, director of producer engagement, CAB GUESTS: Lindsey Hall grew up in the Angus business, on her family’s Maplecrest Farms near Hillsboro, Ohio. She headed off to The Ohio State University where she earned a bachelor’s degree in animal science, followed by a master’s in ruminant nutrition, animal breeding and genetics from Kansas State University. She met her husband, Adam, at the Ohio State Fair, and today they’re raising their two boys in the ag industry. Hall returned to her family’s operation and heads up their Maplecrest Meats enterprise, a storefront where they sell their home-raised beef. Ashley Bruner, Bruner Angus Ranch, ranches with her husband, Travis, their four young children, and his extended family. They have about 500 registered Angus cows on their ranch near Drake, N.D., where they host an annual production sale in June. The family recently partnered with friends and fellow North Dakota Angus ranchers, the Wendel family, to form Dakota Angus — a direct-to-consumer beef merchandizing business. That effort and their commitment to quality recently earned the families the 2023 CAB Progressive Partner award.  RELATED READING: Future Focused Business Don't miss news in the Angus breed. Visit www.AngusJournal.net and subscribe to the AJ Daily e-newsletter and our monthly magazine, the Angus Journal.

November 21 • 1h 7m 53s
Remaining Relevant: Stucky, Yon on Access to Data, Coordination and Competition cover art

Remaining Relevant: Stucky, Yon on Access to Data, Coordination and Competition

There’s risk, and the faith that pushes you to take it. There’s challenge, and critical thinking and intentional action that allows you to overcome. For Gordon Stucky and Kevin Yon, their work as first-generation Angus breeders has been studded with risk, faith, thought and action. In this episode, they give advice and discuss current trends and hurdles, along with the ways they approach them head-on in their seedstock operations. They answer questions like: How do Angus breeders remain competitive? What’s the relevance of a breed association today? How do you work smarter?  HOSTS: Mark McCully and Miranda Reiman GUESTS:  Gordon Stucky’s roots in Kingman County, Kansas, trace back to 1937, when his parents established a diversified crop and livestock operation. Stucky began the transition to a registered Angus cattle herd in 1976. After graduating from Kansas State University with an animal science degree, he returned to the ranch to build the herd he and his wife, Caroline, and family have today. Stucky served as president of the American Angus Association and in leadership roles with the Kansas Livestock Association, Kansas Farm Bureau, Kansas Extension Council and the Beef Improvement Federation. Keivn Yon, Ridge Spring, S.C., and his wife, Lydia, established Yon Family Farms in 1996. All three of their children and their families have returned to the operation, which is now home to 700 head of Angus brood cows and 300 commercial cows. Yon has served as president of the American Angus Association, president of the South Carolina Angus Association and South Carolina Cattlemen’s Association.  This podcast is brought to you by Zoetis Genetics. Visit beefgenetics.com  for more information.   Don't miss news in the Angus breed. Visit www.AngusJournal.net and subscribe to the AJ Daily e-newsletter and our monthly magazine, the Angus Journal.

November 8 • 1h 4m 31s
McDonnells on Efficiency, Innovation, Abundant Opportunities and Disagreeing Gracefully cover art

McDonnells on Efficiency, Innovation, Abundant Opportunities and Disagreeing Gracefully

Leo and Sam McDonnell, Angus breeders from Columbus, Mont., aren’t afraid of hard work, speaking up or taking risks. In this episode the couple covered everything from a post-Angus tour proposal and the story of the Midland Bull Test to ways that a healthy dose of conflict can make everyone better. Working in an industry with a lot of opinions has similarities to running a family ranch, and they have plenty of advice for navigating both.  HOSTS: Mark McCully and Miranda Reiman GUESTS: Leo and Sam McDonnell, Columbus, Mont., devote their time and efforts to providing the most predictable and proven genetics available on their operation, McDonnell Angus. Moving toward trait selection of economic value, the family’s success increased as they worked with breeders toward a common goal — industrywide efficiency. Carrying on what his father started in 1962, Leo managed the Midland Bull Test. The test has since grown to become the largest performance test center in North America, testing about 2,000 bulls annually, and has since been passed on to his son. As Leo and Sam transition their focus to McDonnell Angus, they note that the legacy isn’t the business — the legacy is their children and grandchildren. Related Reading: A Lifetime Dedicated to Improvement: https://www.angusjournal.net/post/a-lifetime-dedicated-to-improvement Don't miss news in the Angus breed. Visit www.AngusJournal.net and subscribe to the AJ Daily e-newsletter and our monthly magazine, the Angus Journal.

October 24 • 1h 4m 46s
Separate Herds, Joint Marketing: Holt, Brown Talk Records, Goals and Service cover art

Separate Herds, Joint Marketing: Holt, Brown Talk Records, Goals and Service

As David Holt and Kent Brown grew separate Angus businesses just down the road from each other, they found a natural partnership. They could do more together than they could separately. The Tennessee neighbors talk about why they went Angus, how whole herd inventory reporting will strengthen their programs and the breed, and the ways they maximized their marketing by working together.  HOSTS: Esther Tarpoff, Mark McCully, Miranda Reiman   GUESTS:   David Holt, of Holt Farms, Livingston, Tenn., was a dairyman for the first 26 years after high school, but when he got out of milking, he immediately switched to Angus. He and his wife have two boys who are involved in agriculture and help around the farm when needed.  Kent Brown of Jared Brown & Son near Rickman, Tenn., got his start in the Angus business from the herd his dad started in 1961. After a few decades of other breeds, he came back to Angus in the early ’90s and sells 60 to 70 registered bulls annually.  This podcast is brought to you by Zoetis Genetics. Visit beefgenetics.com  for more information.      Don't miss news in the Angus breed. Visit www.AngusJournal.net and subscribe to the AJ Daily e-newsletter and our monthly magazine, the Angus Journal.

October 11 • 1h 1m 8s
World Angus Evaluation Combines Growth, Carcass, Maternal Measures — What That Means to Breeders cover art

World Angus Evaluation Combines Growth, Carcass, Maternal Measures — What That Means to Breeders

What do you get when you combine Angus data from three countries on 11 different traits? More accurate and reliable tools, says Kelli Retallick-Riley, president of Angus Genetics Inc. (AGI). The team will release the World Angus Evaluation, in partnership with Angus Australia and the Canadian Angus Association, on Oct. 13, and this episode shares what that means for Angus breeders across the globe.  In addition, the international guests cover genetic and marketing trends in their countries, talk international commerce, share history on past partnerships and invite listeners to go Down Under in 2025.  HOSTS: Miranda Reiman and Kelli Retallick-Riley  GUESTS:  Myles Immerkar, CEO of the Canadian Angus Association, works with the board of directors to grow and promote the Angus breed. He has experience in the animal nutrition and marketing fields and most recently spent 16 years managing the global beef programs for Semex Alliance based in Guelph. Christian Duff is the general manager of genetic improvement for Angus Australia. He’s been with Angus Australia for the past nine years in research roles before taking the lead on the team that completes their genetic evaluation and research projects.  This podcast is brought to you by Zoetis Genetics. Visit beefgenetics.com for more information.    Don't miss news in the Angus breed. Visit www.AngusJournal.net and subscribe to the AJ Daily e-newsletter and our monthly magazine, the Angus Journal.

September 26 • 1h 1m 23s
Bringing Bulls to the City and Buyers to the Farm: Trowbridge on Angus in the Northeast cover art

Bringing Bulls to the City and Buyers to the Farm: Trowbridge on Angus in the Northeast

You’re not going to find expansive Angus ranches on wide open plains in New York, but if you head just 90 miles north of The Big Apple, you will find Trowbridge Farms. With reach across the United States, Phil and Annie Trowbridge, along with son and daughter-in-law, PJ and Miranda, have made a name for themselves by creating cattle for the showring and the commercial industry in tandem. And they’ve done it by leasing small pastures, working closely with their “weekender” neighbors who come out to country homes and helping their customers create a market for their cattle.  This episode covers everything from the family winning the county fair rabbit show to the time they brought a bull to Madison Square Gardens. GUEST:  Phil Trowbridge and his family operate Trowbridge Angus Farms near Ghent, N.Y. Trowbridge earned an animal science degree from Alfred Sate College, Alfred, N.Y. The day after his graduation in 1976, he became a herdsman for Gallagher’s Angus Farm in Ghent, N.Y., and gradually built up his own Angus herd in the same community. He and his wife, Annie, have two grown children and six grandchildren, who are all involved in the farm in some way.  This episode is brought to you by Westway Feed Products. Visit https://westwayfeed.com/ for more information. Related Reading:  Open Gates: https://www.angusjournal.com/articlepdf/cab-trowbridge-ambassador-10_15-aj.pdf Family Matters: https://www.angusjournal.com/articlepdf/president_trowbridge%2011.13.pdf Black Farms, Green Grass — Roseda Angus Farms: https://www.angusjournal.net/post/black-cows-green-grass  Don't miss news in the Angus breed. Visit www.AngusJournal.net and subscribe to the AJ Daily e-newsletter and our monthly magazine, the Angus Journal.

September 12 • 1h 1m 39s
Board Recap: Angus Focus on the Commercial Cattleman, Research Updates, Budgets and the FDA cover art

Board Recap: Angus Focus on the Commercial Cattleman, Research Updates, Budgets and the FDA

If the commercial cattleman isn’t successful, the breed isn’t successful, and the American Angus Association Board of Director’s investment of time on that segment reflects that. Updates on functional longevity and heart health research, projections and budgeting for the fiscal year, and FDA presentations on the gene edit approval process, labeling and processing — that and “a lot more” in this special episode that recaps the when, what and why of discussions at the August 2023 board meeting.  To read the president’s summary, visit https://www.angus.org/pub/LetterFromthePresidentAug2023FINAL.pdf GUESTS:   Chuck Grove is no stranger to the Angus breed. He was a longtime regional manager for the American Angus Association, covering various states during his 39-year tenure including Kentucky, Tennessee, Virginia, Maryland, West Virginia, Delaware and Ohio. Grove and his wife, Ruth, now reside on the family farm and manage a 100-head Angus herd. He is currently serving as president and chairman of the American Angus Association Board. Jim Brinkley has served on the American Angus Association Board of Directors for the past three years. Along with their children, Crystal and Justin, Brinkley and his wife, Sherry, own 1,300 acres and 400 registered Angus cattle at Brinkley Angus Ranch (BAR). He is the current chair of the Certified Angus Beef board and was elected to serve as the upcoming treasurer of the American Angus Association Board.  Smitty Lamb has joined The Angus Conversation before but sat down this week as the chair of Angus Genetics Inc. He grew up on a small-row crop farm in east Georgia, where he discovered his passion for Angus cattle at an early age. After a career in the cotton industry, Lamb came back home to Angus. The family operation, Ogeechee Angus Farm, began in 1997, and markets more than 100 bulls annually. Related reading: Bovine Congestive Heart Failure Work Continues   Don't miss news in the Angus breed. Visit www.AngusJournal.net and subscribe to the AJ Daily e-newsletter and our monthly magazine, the Angus Journal.

August 31 • 41m 18s
The Transformation: Embryo Transfer and Late Nights Turn Knoll Herd into a First-Generation Success Story cover art

The Transformation: Embryo Transfer and Late Nights Turn Knoll Herd into a First-Generation Success Story

Looking back, Steve and Laura Knoll, Hereford, Texas, now remember their first cow herd was a “learning experience.” There are stories to tell, but one of their favorites gets them to the transformation that led to their 2 Bar Angus operation of today. In this episode, hear about the quick lesson in marketability that started their switch to Angus, how a busload of chefs enjoyed the West Texas wind, and why breeding projects used to start at midnight. GUESTS: Steve and Laura Knoll learned the Angus business together. The couple operate 2 Bar Angus near Hereford, Texas, where they raised their four children and cows in tandem. Steve has an ag degree from West Texas A&M University and worked for Cactus Feeders after graduation. Laura served as a pharmacist for a number of years before they both decided to make ranching their sole source of income in the early 2000s. Today, they host an annual bull sale each spring, and partner on a female sale in the fall. They were named the 2018 Certified Angus Beef Seedstock Commitment to Excellence award winners for their focus on carcass quality. This podcast is brought to you by Zoetis Genetics. Visit beefgenetics.com for more information.  RELATED READING: Raising the Right Kind, Right Don't miss news in the Angus breed. Visit www.AngusJournal.net and subscribe to the AJ Daily e-newsletter and our monthly magazine, the Angus Journal.

August 29 • 55m
‘By God’s Grace’: The Sitz Family Overcomes Tragedy by Working Together, Chasing Balance cover art

‘By God’s Grace’: The Sitz Family Overcomes Tragedy by Working Together, Chasing Balance

Resilience and adaptability required in the face of adversity — that describes Jim Sitz’s entry into the Angus business fairly well. When their dad was killed in a ranch accident, Jim, his brother Bob Jr., and sister Sherrie stepped into greater responsibilities, navigating the challenges of digging out of the 1980s economic crisis. Their mom taught them to prioritize needs over wants, and working together as a family they grew at a steady pace. Jim and his wife, Tammi, their children, and Bob and his children make up the third and fourth generation now operating two locations at Harrison and Dillon, Mont. They still focus on the "Sitz look" — deep ribs, strong top lines and sound feet — but have added data from carcass information to genomics into their selection process as it’s become available. They’re always “chasing balance,” Jim says.  The family operates with a monthly meeting, active communication and a strong commitment to each other to do what’s best for the whole. GUESTS:  Jim and Tammi Sitz raise Angus cattle against the scenic backdrop of the Beaverhead Mountains near Dillon, Mont. Jim and his brother Bob, Jr., make up the third generation, and their children the fourth, to carry on the family legacy of raising good cattle, cultivating customer relationships and serving the breed. Jim served on the American Angus Association Board and was president in 2016. This podcast is brought to you by Westway Feed. Visit www.westfeed.com for more information.    Don't miss news in the Angus breed. Visit www.AngusJournal.net and subscribe to the AJ Daily e-newsletter and our monthly magazine, the Angus Journal.

August 15 • 1h 7m 10s
From Heart Scores and Methane to Fertility and Big Data — Beck, Epperly Share Take-Homes from BIF cover art

From Heart Scores and Methane to Fertility and Big Data — Beck, Epperly Share Take-Homes from BIF

What’s discussed at the Beef Improvement Federation (BIF) Research Symposium and Convention today provides a glimpse at beef production advancements in the future. This year’s conference in Calgary, Alberta, focused on collecting and managing large amounts of data, creating tools for cattlemen that don’t exist today and discussing hot topics like the genetic role in methane emissions and heart function. When academia, industry and production segments all gather, there’s sure to be a lot of questions and answers — this podcast brings you the highlights.  HOSTS: Miranda Reiman and Kelli Retallick-Riley  GUESTS: Joe Epperly, Wagonhammer Ranches, is a third-generation Angus breeder raised in the foothills of the Blue Ridge Mountains in Virginia. He spent most of his youth exhibiting livestock, helping on the family farm and working at the family’s livestock market.  He worked at the North American Limousin Foundation (NALF) before moving to Wagonhammer Ranches in Albion, Neb., where he’s the director genetics and sales. He’s a former National Junior Angus Association Board member, current president of the Nebraska Angus Association and immediate past president of BIF.   Dick Beck, vice president of sales and marketing at ORIgen, has been involved in livestock production and marketing for his entire life. As a former regional manager for the American Angus Association and general manager of Three Trees Ranch, in Sharpsburg, Ga., he brought a well-rounded view of the industry to his position at ORIgen. He and his wife, Diane, have two daughters who were active in the National Junior Angus Association, with the third generation involved today.   Don't miss news in the Angus breed. Visit www.AngusJournal.net and subscribe to the AJ Daily e-newsletter and our monthly magazine, the Angus Journal.

July 14 • 37m 8s
Board Recap: A New Research EPD, Grass-Fed CAB and Gene Editing cover art

Board Recap: A New Research EPD, Grass-Fed CAB and Gene Editing

The Functional Longevity (FL) expected progeny difference will be released in a research form this summer, Certified Angus Beef now has a grass-fed line, and the gene edit on the table was not approved at this time. That and much more in this special episode that recaps the whens, whys and hows of many updates discussed in the June 2023 meeting of the American Angus Association Board of Directors.    To see the president's letter and the memo referenced in this podcast, visit www.Angus.org.  GUESTS:   Chuck Grove is no stranger to the Angus breed. He was a longtime regional manager for the American Angus Association, covering various states during his 39-year tenure including Kentucky, Tennessee, Virginia, Maryland, West Virginia, Delaware and Ohio. Grove and his wife, Ruth, now reside on the family farm and manage a 100-head Angus herd. He is currently serving as president and chairman of the American Angus Association Board.  Barry Pollard was raised in Hennessey, Okla., where his father taught vocational agriculture and his mother was a schoolteacher. After attending Oklahoma State University and finishing his education at Oklahoma University, Pollard became a board-certified neurosurgeon and returned home to open a medical practice in Enid, Okla., in 1982. He and his wife, Roxanne, have five children and several grandchildren.  Pollard started his Angus herd in 1992, and has built it to more than 30 elite donor cows, 400 performance cows and heifers, raising 400-500 spring and fall calves every year. He has served on the American Angus Association Board since 2016.  Don't miss news in the Angus breed. Visit www.AngusJournal.net and subscribe to the AJ Daily e-newsletter and our monthly magazine, the Angus Journal.

June 9 • 40m 40s
Running Down the Road: Jacobs, Frye Talk Seedstock Marketing Then and Now cover art

Running Down the Road: Jacobs, Frye Talk Seedstock Marketing Then and Now

The cattle have to be good, but the customer service is what seals the deal. That’s according to Roger Jacobs, who has helped breeders sell their Angus bulls for more than four decades as a leading livestock auctioneer. When he says “service”, that includes caring about the family, creating a market for your customer’s cattle and standing behind your product. He and Ron Frye talk about hitting the road in their younger years, how the cattle and the business have evolved, and the shift to technology from DNA to video sales. They wrap up a strong 2023 bull sale season and look ahead to the future.  HOSTS: Mark McCully and Miranda Reiman GUESTS:   Roger Jacobs was born and raised on a farm/ranch in southwest North Dakota, as one of six boys on the operation that raised Angus cattle and small grains. In 1975 Roger graduated from North Dakota State University with a bachelor’s in animal science. He worked as a regional manager for the American Angus Association and Angus Journal from 1977 to 1983, at which time he and his wife, Sandy, started Jacobs Livestock Sales, Inc. The purebred livestock auction company sells 80 to 100 sales per year, across 25 states and Canada. Roger and Sandy have three grown children and eight grandchildren. Roger enjoys spending time with family, cooking, gardening, and his outdoor pursuits, which include fishing and bird hunting. Ron Frye, Ron Frye Marketing, grew up in Wyoming, but has called Montana his home since 1990. He started his professional career with the Wyoming Stockman/Farmer Stockman magazines in Spokane, Wash., and later worked for the Western Livestock Journal. In 1992 Ron began a decade of serving as a regional manager for the American Angus Association, getting to know producers across the West. In. 2001 he left for a four-year stint at Edwards Angus Ranch, Denton, Mont., until their dispersion, when he continued his Angus marketing career at KG Ranch in Three Forks, Mont. In early 2015 he started Ron Frye Marketing. He and his wife, Lynette, have three children: Randy, Kyle and Jillian.    Don't miss news in the Angus breed. Visit www.AngusJournal.net and subscribe to the AJ Daily e-newsletter and our monthly magazine, the Angus Journal.

May 23 • 1h 7m 25s
Starting From Scratch: The Fink Beef Genetics Story cover art

Starting From Scratch: The Fink Beef Genetics Story

Starting From Scratch: The Fink Beef Genetics Story  From a few cows in the back yard (yes, seriously) to consistently ranking among the top 25 largest seedstock producers in the United States, Galen and Lori Fink built their ranch and reputation from the ground up. Near Manhattan, Kan., they grew Fink Beef Genetics on leased ground and by renting space in commercial cows, pioneering the embryo transfer (ET) model many use today. They share the leap of faith it took to give up full-time jobs, how they generate and implement new ideas, and one of their first splurges when they were finally sure they were going to make it.   HOSTS: Mark McCully and Miranda Reiman GUESTS: Galen and Lori Fink, Fink Beef Genetics, began their Angus seedstock operation in 1977 with a handful of cows and lots of hard work. By day, Galen managed the Kansas State University purebred herd, and Lori was the Kansas Angus Association secretary; and their own interests came after that. In 2006 they purchased a piece of ground and moved their ranch near Randolph, Kan.   The Finks were named 2002 Beef Improvement Federation (BIF) Seedstock Producers of the Year and 2008 Certified Angus Beef Commitment to Excellence Award winners. Galen received the Beef Improvement Federation Pioneer Award in 2021. They’re also co-owners of the Little Apple Brewing Company (LABCo) in Manhattan, Kan.   Today, their daughter Megan Larson is now involved, along with her husband, Chad, and their daughter, Whitley.    Don't miss news in the Angus breed. Visit www.AngusJournal.net and subscribe to the AJ Daily e-newsletter and our monthly magazine, the Angus Journal.

May 9 • 1h 5m 48s
Bovine Congestive Heart Failure: An Angus Issue, an Industry Issue or No Issue At All? cover art

Bovine Congestive Heart Failure: An Angus Issue, an Industry Issue or No Issue At All?

When there’s a challenge in the cattle business, sometimes it’s easier to point fingers than to find solutions. Bovine congestive heart failure (BCHF) has been a growing topic of discussion in the last decade, and this episode unpacks if it's a genetic problem or a management problem? And perhaps, most importantly, is it an Angus problem? Hear from a breeder, a veterinarian and a geneticist as they uncover real-world examples and research findings to help put the pieces together. Leave with an idea of what we know and what we’re hoping to know in the future. HOSTS: Mark McCully, Miranda Reiman and Kelli Retallick-Riley  GUESTS:   Randall Spare is a large animal veterinarian in southwest Kansas with a wide reach in the cow-calf sector and consulting with feedlot operations. Growing up on a Kansas dairy farm, Randall went to Kansas State University for both his undergraduate and veterinary degrees. After gaining early experience in another practice, he helped establish Ashland Veterinary Center (AVC) and has been helping producers across the state ever since. Today he serves as president, and through dedication and teamwork, AVC has become the largest veterinary practice in southwest Kansas. Randall and his wife, Michelle, are parents to five children, Anna, Bethany, Mark, Abigail and John.   Darrell Stevenson, Stevenson Angus Ranch, has strong ties to the Angus breed and a history of involvement in the Montana Angus Association. Stevenson’s grandparents were charter members in 1951, and his father participated in the first National Junior Angus Showmanship contest in 1967. Stevenson was involved in 4-H and FFA, where he served as a state officer. He went to Montana State University and Oklahoma State University before returning home to the ranch near Hobson. He and his wife Sara have two children, CJ and Claire.  Stevenson has served on the American Angus Association Board of Directors since 2020.  Related Content: Healthy Hearts Start with Knowing More Video: Research on Bovine Congestive Heart Failure Don't miss news in the Angus breed. Visit www.AngusJournal.net and subscribe to the AJ Daily e-newsletter and our monthly magazine, the Angus Journal.

April 25 • 1h 19m 45s
Kelly Schaff’s Ideal Angus Cow and the Tools That Create Her cover art

Kelly Schaff’s Ideal Angus Cow and the Tools That Create Her

In the cattle business, it’s easy to follow the fads or to veer slowly off course, but for Kelly Schaff, discipline has been his trademark. He gets to know each calf, clips his own bulls and takes many of the pictures seen throughout Schaff Angus Valley’s marketing materials. Maybe that’s in part because he’s particular, but also because it makes him better at his roles of customer consultant and chief breeder.   “I think when you really like the cattle and know them, you can represent them better, but also you like to look at good cattle. If you're around them every day, it gives you incentive to breed better cattle,” Schaff says.   This episode covers the ranch and herd history, breeding decisions and how they’ve intentionally built a brand to match. He talks about tools and diversity in the breed, the advantage of competition and how to stay focused.     GUEST:   Kelly Schaff, Schaff Angus Valley, is a fourth-generation North Dakota rancher who has spent his entire career building and refining the family’s operation with his wife, Martie Jo. Their daughters, Kelsie and Kourtney, make up the fifth generation — with a young granddaughter now starting the sixth.     Schaff was born and raised in the Angus business, taking on responsibility early. He learned breeding and customer service from his grandpa, dad and uncles, and then added his own stamp. In 2001 he and Martie purchased a core group of cows and took the reins as his parents retired. Today they sell Angus cattle worldwide.   Related Content:  Believing in Bonsma Giving Back — I am Angus with Kelly Schaff Don't miss news in the Angus breed. Visit www.AngusJournal.net and subscribe to the AJ Daily e-newsletter and our monthly magazine, the Angus Journal.

April 11 • 1h 10m 58s
Corah, Nichols: Will Breed Associations, Land Grants Become Obsolete and Other Life Lessons cover art

Corah, Nichols: Will Breed Associations, Land Grants Become Obsolete and Other Life Lessons

When you’ve made a career out of being a lifelong learner, you’ve got a lot of wisdom to share. These guests gave us practical nuggets, visionary insight and a few laughs, too.   Hear from Larry Corah and Dave Nichols, who crossed paths at Kansas State University decades ago and have been colleagues and friends ever since. They cover everything from the impact of genomics on breed registries to how incoming animal science students have changed over the years. HOSTS: Mark McCully and Miranda Reiman GUESTS:  Larry Corah and Dave Nichols Larry Corah, professor emeritus Kansas State University, former Certified Angus Beef vice president   Growing up on a small North Dakota farm during the 1950s, Larry Corah watched as technology reshaped the agriculture industry. That background led to a passion for learning by doing, and he earned degrees from North Dakota State University, Michigan State University and the University of Wyoming before settling in Manhattan, Kan., with his wife and young children. He began as the feedlot specialist at Kansas State University (K-State) and held many roles there, where he developed an internship program and mentored many students. He worked briefly for the National Cattlemen’s Beef Association before he spent two decades helping create and lead the supply development efforts at Certified Angus Beef as a vice president.      Dave Nichols, professor emeritus Kansas State University   Raised on a commercial beef cattle, swine and crops operation in Indiana, Dave Nichols’ love for agriculture drove him to earn degrees from Purdue and Kansas State University (K-State). After earning his doctorate from K-State, Nichols stayed on campus as faculty. From 1981 to 2021, Nichols taught and mentored more than 14,000 students on the topics of livestock and carcass evaluation, sales management, and beef systems management. His teachings went beyond the classroom, as he led students on a variety of student abroad trips and has spoken and judged at both national and world events. Dave and his wife, Anita, currently own and operate A&D Ranch near Manhattan. The pair has two children and recently welcomed their first grandchild.    Related Content:  Life Long Student, Teacher: https://www.angusjournal.com/articlepdf/ Dr. Dave Nichols, Livestock Publications Council Headliner Award Winner:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t0LsT3lvfoU Don't miss news in the Angus breed. Visit www.AngusJournal.net and subscribe to the AJ Daily e-newsletter and our monthly magazine, the Angus Journal.

March 28 • 1h 4m 28s
The Packer or the Producer — Who Has the Power to Improve Beef Quality? cover art

The Packer or the Producer — Who Has the Power to Improve Beef Quality?

There was a time when the beef industry thought product quality was as good as it was going to get. Those who worked in research and development were exploring everything from pumped product to mechanical tenderization methods to increase consumer acceptance. What changed? Economic signals became more precise, beef quality quantification methods improved and cattlemen acted on the data they received. In a relatively short time, beef quality skyrocketed.   So, what does the landscape look like today? What’s the next round of advancements going to bring and why should breeders care?   HOSTS: Mark McCully and Miranda Reiman GUESTS:  Glen Dolezal and John Stika Glen Dolezal, assistant vice president, new technology applications, at Cargill Protein, has worked in many facets of the packing sector. He started his career at Cargill in 1999 in research and development, but has added responsibilities during that nearly 24-year tenure to include sales and grading functions. He oversaw the implementation of the company’s tenderness claim and the move to camera grading. Prior to working in the private sector, Glen spent 16 years in academia at Oklahoma State University. A Texas native, he holds degrees from Texas A&M and Oklahoma State University.   John Stika, president, Certified Angus Beef, leads the American Angus Association’s consumer-facing subsidiary. The brand that is owned by registered Angus breeders and operates to create pull-through demand for Angus cattle has grown to more than 1.234 billion pounds of sales annually under his leadership. He joined CAB in 1999 in what was the feeder-packer relations division, before working in business development and assuming the role of president in 2006. He’s a Kansas farm boy, with degrees in animal and meat science from Kansas State University and the University of Kentucky.  This episode is sponsored by Westway Feed Products.  Visit https://westwayfeed.com/ to learn more.  Don't miss news in the Angus breed. Visit www.AngusJournal.net and subscribe to the AJ Daily e-newsletter and our monthly magazine, the Angus Journal.

March 14 • 1h 1m 48s
Bennett, Henderson: Bad Water, Bad Grass and Creating Cattle that Work cover art

Bennett, Henderson: Bad Water, Bad Grass and Creating Cattle that Work

From high sulfur water and two-section pastures to fescue toxicity and hot, humid climates — Angus cattlemen operate in environments as varied as their zip codes. But do Angus cattle really belong in every corner of this country?    In this episode, Texas cattleman James Henderson and Virginia breeder Paul Bennett talk about the way they design cattle that will work in the tough environments their customers operate in, from the deep south to higher elevations. What tools do they use, which ones do they wish they had and where would they move if they could ranch anywhere? Listen and find out.  HOSTS: Mark McCully and Miranda Reiman GUESTS: James Henderson, Paul Bennett James Henderson was born in Kerrville, Texas, as a fourth-generation rancher in the Texas Hill Country. He received a degree in animal science in 1977 from Texas A&M University and moved to a career in the meatpacking and processing industry. In 2004, James married Mary Lou Bradley, and the couple continues the time-tested traditions of Bradley 3 Ranch. Henderson is a former American Angus Association Board member. Paul Bennett is a fourth-generation seedstock producer who grew up on his family’s operation, Knoll Crest Farm, Inc. (KCF). He graduated from Virginia Tech with an animal science degree, then returned home to run the farm with his brother and nephew. KCF focuses on annually generating 400 high-quality bulls to supply the commercial beef industry. A lifetime cattleman, Bennett has served as president of the Beef Improvement Federation (BIF), Virginia Cattlemen’s Association, Virginia Beef Cattle Improvement Association, as well as a board member of the Virginia Angus Association and the National Beef Cattle Evaluation Consortium. He currently serves on the American Angus Association Board of Directors.     Related Content:   Bradley 3 Ranch earns CAB Sustainability Award:  https://www.angusjournal.net/post/more-with-less  Balance and Longevity Discussed at Convention: https://www.angusjournal.net/post/even-better  By the Numbers: Angus Hair Shedding EPD: https://www.angusjournal.com/articlepdf/0722-by-the-numbers.pdf  This episode sponsored by Westway Feed Products.  Visit https://westwayfeed.com/ to learn more.  Don't miss news in the Angus breed. Visit www.AngusJournal.net and subscribe to the AJ Daily e-newsletter and our monthly magazine, the Angus Journal.

February 28 • 58m 36s
From Judge Selection to the First Gene Edit on the Table: The Angus Board Recap cover art

From Judge Selection to the First Gene Edit on the Table: The Angus Board Recap

What do Angus breeders need from their Association? How can the breed ensure the success of its commercial customers? Those questions were applied to dozens of topics across the Board meeting agendas for the American Angus Association and its four entities this week.  Here we rehash some of the most in-depth discussions from the first application for a gene edit and the changes in AngusLink to judge selection and foot scores.   HOSTS: Mark McCully and Miranda Reiman GUESTS: Chuck Grove, John Dickinson, Smitty Lamb Chuck Grove is no stranger to the Angus breed. He was a longtime regional manager for the American Angus Association, covering various states during his 39-year tenure including Kentucky, Tennessee, Virginia, Maryland, West Virginia, Delaware and Ohio. Grove and his wife, Ruth, now reside on the family farm and manage a 100-head Angus herd. He is currently serving as president and chairman of the American Angus Association Board.  John Dickinson, is a fifth-generation Angus breeder and a former National Junior Angus Board (NJAB) chairman. A University of Illinois graduate and former regional manager for the American Angus Association, Dickinson often makes the trek between his cows in California and his home in Idaho. He is also a founding partner in Parnell Dickinson, Inc., a full-service marketing firm that works in all facets of promotion, management and cattle trade — both seedstock and commercial.  Smitty Lamb and his cousin Clint Smith, along with their families, started Ogeechee Farms near Wadley, Ga., in 1997. Today they host a joint Southern Synergy sale with their friends at CAM Ranches. Smitty holds a bachelor’s and master’s degree from the University of Georgia and served as an extension educator and an area livestock teacher in the state before taking a role in cotton merchandizing.     Related Content:   Gene Editing and Angus: A New Way to Solve Old Problems?:  https://www.angusjournal.net/episodes/episode/77f7f8ba/gene-editing-and-angus-a-new-way-to-solve-old-problems  Copy, Replace and Delete: https://www.angusjournal.net/post/copy-replace-delete   Read the Board Meeting Highlight Letter: https://www.angus.org/pub/LetterFromPresidentFeb2023.pdf     Don't miss news in the Angus breed. Visit www.AngusJournal.net and subscribe to the AJ Daily e-newsletter and our monthly magazine, the Angus Journal.

February 24 • 32m 31s
Chasing Rabbits Wasn’t Fun and Other Wisdom from Randy Blach cover art

Chasing Rabbits Wasn’t Fun and Other Wisdom from Randy Blach

Forty years ago the beef market was “a train wreck,” says Randy Blach, CEO of CattleFax. Beef demand dropped by $250 a head, and hundreds of thousands of cattle producers exited the business.   So, how did we get to 2022? Last year, the United States had the highest total beef production in the history of the industry and yet the widest spreads (Choice-Select, Prime-Choice and Certified Angus Beef-Choice). Beef demand is alive and well.   Yet, as cow herd numbers decline, these next few years will be “separating years” for seedstock breeders. Time to up your game.    HOSTS: Mark McCully and Miranda Reiman GUEST: Randy Blach Randy Blach, CattleFax CEO, has worked as a beef market analyst since first joining the organization in 1981. A Colorado native and Colorado State University alum, Blach is still actively involved in his family’s ranching operation. A sought-after speaker, Blach’s strength is in making economics relatable, practical and useable to the cattlemen he serves.   Related Reading: The Cattle Market Teacher: https://www.angusjournal.com/ArticlePDF/0822-FQF-award.pdf  Don't miss news in the Angus breed. Visit www.AngusJournal.net and subscribe to the AJ Daily e-newsletter and our monthly magazine, the Angus Journal.

February 14 • 55m 5s
The Stock Show: Krebs, Scott on Using the Ring to Build a Ranch, Relationships cover art

The Stock Show: Krebs, Scott on Using the Ring to Build a Ranch, Relationships

Eldon Krebs has been exhibiting at the National Western Stock Show for more than six decades. He’s got thoughts on competition, fads and progress, with plenty of historical stories thrown in.   From the grounds of the National Western Stock Show, Krebs and his son-in-law Jake Scott discuss using the show ring as a marketing tool, tips for generational transfer and who is really in charge of breeding decisions.  HOSTS: Mark McCully and Miranda Reiman  GUESTS:  Eldon Krebs and Jake Scott Eldon Krebs is a lifelong cattlemen, growing up on a commercial ranch near Neligh, Neb., and attending the University of Nebraska. He worked on purebred operations before he and his wife, Louisa, started the Krebs Ranch near Gordon, Neb., in 1979. A longtime supporter of the National Western Stock Show, he has several grand champion banners and was named the Friend of National Western by the Red Meat Club this year.  Jake Scott is married to Eldon and Louisa’s daughter Kami and currently works on marketing and customers relations for Krebs Ranch. After graduating from Oklahoma State University and managing a ranch in Oklahoma the couple moved back to Kami’s roots where they’re both involved in the operation and raising their kids in the Sandhills.   Related Reading:   More Than Hired Hands Making Life Easier for Everybody The Very Best Beef: To Finish Right, Start Right The National Western Stock Show will be covered in the March Angus Journal. Subscribe today to receive this edition. Don't miss news in the Angus breed. Visit www.AngusJournal.net and subscribe to the AJ Daily e-newsletter and our monthly magazine, the Angus Journal.

January 31 • 54m 13s
Gene Editing and Angus: A New Way to Solve Old Problems? cover art

Gene Editing and Angus: A New Way to Solve Old Problems?

Gene editing. What might sound like exciting possibilities to some cattlemen can seem like science fiction to others.   Is gene editing the same as a genetically modified organism (GMO)? Is the technology already being used today? What problems could it help us solve and what cautions do we have?  The American Angus Association has adopted rules for how a gene-edited animal would make it into the breed registry, but there are still a lot of unanswered questions and discussions to have. This conversation with geneticists Larry Kuehn and Maci Mueller helps unpack those.   GUESTS:   Larry Kuehn was raised on a diversified (cow-calf, feedlot, grain, hay) farm near Heartwell, Neb. He received a bachelor’s degree in animal science from the University of Nebraska, a master’s in animal breeding from Colorado State University, and a doctorate in animal breeding from Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University.   He was hired as a postdoctoral research associate at the USDA, ARS, U.S. Meat Animal Research Center (USMARC) in 2006 and as a permanent research geneticist that same year. He served as the research leader for the Genetics and Animal Breeding Research unit at USMARC. Kuehn is a co-leader of the USMARC Germplasm Evaluation (GPE) program. In this role, he coordinates the sampling and mating of industry representative sires from 18 beef breed associations and the subsequent phenotyping of offspring for economically relevant traits. Kuehn uses results from this program to produce yearly updates to the across-breed expected progeny difference (EPD) adjustment factors; this analysis provides up-to-date estimates of breed differences for EPD measured growth and carcass traits in 18 breeds of beef cattle. The GPE population is also the primary beef resource for genomic discovery at USMARC and has been extensively genotyped with high-density marker arrays.   Maci Mueller is completing her doctorate in livestock genomics and biotechnology at the University of California, Davis where she is working with Alison Van Eenennaam. Mueller is originally from Princeton, Neb., where she was actively involved in her family’s first-generation seedstock operation, Lienetics Angus Ranch. This experience was instrumental in developing her career goal of becoming an animal geneticist. She earned her bachelor’s in animal science with a political science minor from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln and her master’s in animal biology from UC Davis.  Maci’s graduate research is focused on the application of genetic-based biotechnology, specifically gene editing, to improve livestock production. Maci is passionate about effective science communication and is driven to provide research and education to expand the availability and application of genetic-based biotechnologies in livestock production systems to improve animal health and welfare and production efficiency.     Related Reading: Copy, Replace and Delete: https://www.angusjournal.net/post/copy-replace-delete  The Showring, the Microscope and the Angus Cow: https://www.angusjournal.net/post/the-showring-the-microscope-and-the-angus-cow  Don't miss news in the Angus breed. Visit www.AngusJournal.net and subscribe to the AJ Daily e-newsletter and our monthly magazine, the Angus Journal.

January 17 • 1h 4m 55s
Solving the Consumer Puzzle: CAB, Sysco and an Angus Producer Talk About Win-Wins cover art

Solving the Consumer Puzzle: CAB, Sysco and an Angus Producer Talk About Win-Wins

Consumers want to eat beef, and producers are doing the right things — the opportunity lies in communicating that with data through the supply chain.  A buyer for the largest broadline foodservice distributor in the world sits down with an Angus breeder and a beef brand representative to talk all things beef demand. Did they solve the consumer puzzle? Listen to the last episode in our inaugural season of The Angus Conversation, recorded live from Angus Convention.  HOSTS: Nicole Erceg, Certified Angus Beef; Miranda Reiman  GUESTS: Jonathan Perry, Jessica Willingham Jessica Willingham is the Director of Beef procurement for Sysco, the world’s largest broadline foodservice distributor and an important Certified Angus Beef licensed partner. Formerly with JBS and Tyson, Jessica is focused on serving the beef industry and involved in Sysco’s beef sustainability initiatives. Johnathan Perry, manages Deer Valley Farms near Fayetteville, Tenn., and owns Hickory House restaurant (a Certified Angus Beef licensee) with his wife, Jackie. He chaired the Certified Angus Beef Board of Directors from 2020 to 2022, and currently serves as the Association’s treasurer. Related Reading:  Breeding for a Better Future: https://www.angusjournal.net/post/breeding-for-a-better-future The Cattle Contribution: http://www.angusjournal.com/articlepdf/0122-cab-ducks-unlimited.pdf Cut the Bull:  https://www.cutthebull.info/ Don't miss news in the Angus breed. Visit www.AngusJournal.net and subscribe to the AJ Daily e-newsletter and our monthly magazine, the Angus Journal.

December 13 • 46m 43s
Is Having Great Cattle Enough? How Service, Family Relationships Sell Bulls cover art

Is Having Great Cattle Enough? How Service, Family Relationships Sell Bulls

More than one seedstock producer has had these thoughts: raising great cattle is more fun than figuring out the puzzle it is to market them.  Breeders Kenny Hinkle, Hinkle’s Prime Cut Angus, and Smitty Lamb, Ogeechee Angus Farm, talk about the cattle they’re creating and how they let people know what they stand for.  Spoiler alert: it’s more than a specific advertising plan.  HOSTS: Miranda Reiman with guest co-host Julie Murnin, Angus Media  GUESTS: Kenny Hinkle, Smitty Lamb Kenny Hinkle and his wife, Janyce, started Hinkle’s Prime Cut Angus in 1995 and have built it from the ground up. Their Nevada, Mo., farm focuses on two sets of people: their customers and the final beef consumer. It has grown to market 300 bulls a year and now supports their entire family, including their son Trevor, daughter Courtney and their families.  Smitty Lamb and his cousin Clint Smith, along with their families, started Ogeechee Farms near Wadley, Ga., in 1997. Today they host a joint Southern Synergy sale with their friends at CAM Ranches. Smitty holds a bachelor’s and master’s degree from the University of Georgia and served as an extension educator and an area livestock teacher in the state before taking a role in cotton merchandizing.  Related Reading:  Building Better Beef: https://www.angusjournal.com/ArticlePDF/1018-CAB-Hinkle.pdf Don't miss news in the Angus breed. Visit www.AngusJournal.net and subscribe to the AJ Daily e-newsletter and our monthly magazine, the Angus Journal.

November 29 • 43m 46s
Keeping Cattlemen Independent: Goggins, Perrier on Securing the Future cover art

Keeping Cattlemen Independent: Goggins, Perrier on Securing the Future

We have to keep independent farmers and ranchers in business. We need ag youth to come back our rural communities. How high do cattle prices have to go to accomplish this?  Joe Goggins, Vermilon Ranch, and Matt Perrier, Dalebanks Angus, discuss what it was like to scrape by through the 1980s, share the changes they have seen in more recent decades and predict the fate of the cattle industry in the future.  This episode is straight from Angus Convention and continues a popular conversation that was first started on the main stage. GUESTS: Joe Goggins, with his wife, Linda, and three children, are long-time ranchers from Billings, Mont. Joe and the Goggins family are owners of the Vermilion Ranch, where they have raised registered Angus Cattle since 1964. Annually, the Goggins family breeds 2,200 Angus cows and heifers and markets approximately 1,000 bulls each year. The Vermilion Ranch, along with Joe’s own operation, J&L Livestock, develops and breeds 10,000 of the top-performing Angus heifers in the industry. Each year, they offer a large selection of commercial and registered Angus females in their spring and fall sales.   Following in the footsteps of his father, Pat Goggins, Joe has auctioneered many top purebred sales around America and remains directly involved in the family’s livestock auction markets: Northern Livestock Video Auction, Public Auction Yards, Billings Livestock Commission in Billings, and Western Livestock Auction in Great Falls, Montana.   Matt Perrier is part-owner and manager of Dalebanks Angus. He and his wife, Amy, have five children and reside near Eureka, Kan.  Matt graduated from Kansas State University in 1996 and worked for eight years in various marketing and public relations positions within the beef community, including the American Angus Association from 1997 till 2004. They returned to Eureka in 2004.  Dalebanks was settled by Matt’s ancestors in 1867, and they have raised registered Angus since 1904. They market roughly 200 bulls annually, plus raise corn, wheat, soybeans and cover-crops for livestock feed and grazing. Matt also produces a weekly podcast, Practically Ranching.  Matt is a past president of the Beef Improvement Federation and Kansas Livestock Association.   Related Reading:   Competing with Quality: http://www.angusjournal.com/ArticlePDF/CAB%20Goggins%2010_13.pdf  They Run Deep:  https://www.angusjournal.com/ArticlePDF/1020-CAB-SCE-Dalebanks.pdf  The Unbreakable Chain:  http://www.angusjournal.com/articlepdf/0822-blockchain.pdf  Don't miss news in the Angus breed. Visit www.AngusJournal.net and subscribe to the AJ Daily e-newsletter and our monthly magazine, the Angus Journal.

November 15 • 1h 11m 59s
In Demand — Why Angus Breeders Are So Optimistic cover art

In Demand — Why Angus Breeders Are So Optimistic

In this bonus episode, cover four days’ worth of the 2022 Angus Convention in about a half an hour. New president Chuck Grove joins fellow Board member Mark Ahearn to chat about optimism in the business and other hallway conversations from Salt Lake City.  The 139th Annual Convention of Delegates put a bow on the weekend crammed full of education and camaraderie, and Grove shared the new leadership and discussed how they plan to tackle what’s ahead. HOSTS: Mark McCully, Miranda Reiman  GUESTS: Chuck Grove, Mark Ahearn  GUEST BIOS:  Chuck Grove, Forest, Va., is no stranger to the Angus breed. He was a longtime regional manager for the American Angus Association, covering various states during his 39-year tenure including Kentucky, Tennessee, Virginia, Maryland, West Virginia, Delaware and Ohio. Grove and his wife, Ruth, now reside on the family farm and manage a 100-head Angus herd. He was recently elected to serve as president and chairman of the American Angus Association Board and says he looks forward to the year ahead.  Mark Ahearn and his family established Turner Meadow Ranch in East Texas in the mid-1980s. He spent 35 years in law enforcement, while also raising high-quality Angus cattle. He has studied pedigrees and learned the business from the ground up. They herd has grown to about 200 females, and he is an active member of the Texas Angus Association, where he served in leadership roles for 16 years. He’s been on the American Angus Association Board of Directors since 2020. Related reading: https://www.angusjournal.net/post/new-leadership-directors-elected  https://www.angusjournal.net/post/q-a-president-s-perspective  Don't miss news in the Angus breed. Visit www.AngusJournal.net and subscribe to the AJ Daily e-newsletter and our monthly magazine, the Angus Journal.

November 8 • 34m 20s
Eggers, Meyer: Making Progress, Carefully cover art

Eggers, Meyer: Making Progress, Carefully

Genetic progress happens faster today than it did decades ago. Is there an ideal pace? Two Angus producers discuss how they use embryo transfer (ET), artificial insemination (AI) and natural service in their breeding programs, and how they draw on genomic and phenotypic data to make their selections in the first place. “A really good breeder told me about 30 years ago … part of this thing is getting there as fast as you can. He said, just as importantly, never back up. So, you know, try to balance risk and reward,” says Ben Eggers, Sydenstricker Genetics. He and Darin Meyer, De-Su Angus, cover a lot of ground in this one. HOSTS: Mark McCully, Brett Spader, Miranda Reiman  GUESTS: Ben Eggers, Sydenstricker Genetics; Darin Meyer, De-Su Angus GUEST BIOS: Ben Eggers has been involved in breeding registered Angus cattle since he acquired his first 4-H project heifer in 1964. He was active in 4-H, FFA and junior Angus, and as he grew up, became one of the youngest members of the Missouri Beef Cattle Improvement Association, while performance testing was in its infancy. He has worked for several Angus breeders through the years, and has been at Sydenstricker Genetics, Mexico, Mo., for 40 years this month. His wife, Darla, handles all the data submission for SydGen. He is a past president of Missouri Cattlemen’s Association, the Beef Improvement Federation and the American Angus Association. Darin Meyer grew up on a diversified farm in northeast Iowa, where he gained experience with both dairy cattle and commercial beef cattle. Early on he showed an interest in the genetic side of the business, and his dad allowed him to take ownership in their breeding programs. Since then, he and his family have expanded the dairy business and added a registered Angus herd, forming De-Su Angus with locations in New Albion and Fremont, Iowa, which is the former Summit Crest Iowa farm. They have 1,500 cows, and focus on creating the highest $C cattle, while maintaining function. A crew of dedicated employees do everything from cattle care, reproductive ultrasound, artificial insemination to an in-house embryo transfer flush program. Related Reading:   http://www.angusjournal.com/articlepdf/0322-et.pdf  http://www.angusjournal.com/articlepdf/ararecommodity.pdf  Don't miss news in the Angus breed. Visit www.AngusJournal.net and subscribe to the AJ Daily e-newsletter and our monthly magazine, the Angus Journal.

November 1 • 58m 5s
Denowh, Lowe: Keeping the Maternal Breed Maternal cover art

Denowh, Lowe: Keeping the Maternal Breed Maternal

It’s the original maternal breed, but are all Angus cows maternal?  “The cows are kind of the employee. They have to show up. It’s our job to take care of the cow, it is the cow’s job to take care of the calf,” says Joe Lowe, Smiths Grove, Ky.  Lowe; Chad Denowh of Sidney, Mont.; and Kelli Retallick-Riley of Angus Genetics Inc. (AGI) discussed what it takes to have cows that work where they live and work further down the line.   The trio talk data, phenotypes, tools they use and ones they wish they had.    Maybe you have some ideas of your own? If so, be sure to find us on social media or drop us a line in the comment box at TheAngusConversation.com.    HOSTS: Mark McCully and Miranda Reiman  GUESTS: Chad Denowh, Gartner-Denowh Angus Ranch; Joe Lowe, Oak Hollow Angus; Kelli Retalick-Riley, Angus Genetics Inc.   GUEST BIOS:  Chad Denowh, Gartner-Denowh Angus Ranch, has been in the seedstock business from day one. He grew up helping his parents and extended family at their Sidney, Mont., ranch, and returned to the operation after graduating from Montana State University with a degree in animal science. He and his wife, Jenn, and their three daughters make up the fifth and sixth generation of cattlemen raising sires that “go out and get the job done for commercial cattlemen.” They are longtime participants in the Angus Herd Improvement Record (AHIR) program and have taken nearly every step to equip their customers with all the information available from embracing genomic technology to focusing on more difficult to measure traits like foot score.    Joe Lowe is an eighth-generation beef producer in Smiths Grove, Ky., where he and his father own and manage Oak Hollow Angus. The Lowe family was involved in backgrounding, finishing and commercial cow-calf production before Joe’s father began the seedstock herd in 1978. Oak Hollow calves in both spring and fall and hosts two on-farm bull sales each year. The breeding philosophy emphasizes data-driven maternal selection for fertility, structural soundness and environmental adaptability to fescue while producing a highly marketable calf crop at all marketing points in the supply chain. Joe received an undergraduate degree in economics from the University of Louisville and a master’s in agricultural economics from the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, before returning to the operation full time in 2013.  Joe is active with the Kentucky Cattleman’s Association and currently serves as Kentucky Beef Council chair.    Kelli Retallick-Riley, president, Angus Genetics Inc.  Related Reading:   https://www.angusjournal.net/post/even-better  http://www.angusjournal.com/articlepdf/1021-by-the-numbers.pdf  http://www.angusjournal.com/articlepdf/0422-by-the-numbers.pdf  Don't miss news in the Angus breed. Visit www.AngusJournal.net and subscribe to the AJ Daily e-newsletter and our monthly magazine, the Angus Journal.

October 18 • 51m 33s
Willis, Noble: Commercial Cattlemen Want It All cover art

Willis, Noble: Commercial Cattlemen Want It All

From a  young age commercial cattlemen Jordan Willis, Cokeville, Wyo., and Ryan Noble, Yuma, Colo., both had a laser focus career goal: they wanted to ranch.   Separate operations, but similar paths.   “I didn't understand what it was going take for us to all be back here on the place, but I always wanted to be here,” Willis says. Today, he and his wife, Jennie, manage their family ranch with his extended family.  After college, Noble came home to his parent’s ranch that had survived the 1980s. Making it work to support another family, which now includes wife Ronella and their kids, would be just that:  work.  Both families built their herds and developed a marketing path over the years. They use American Angus Association programs and reap the benefits of an investment in themselves. This conversation touches on genetic selection, how their seedstock supplier helps them reach their goals and what they’ll need more of in the future.   HOSTS: Miranda Reiman and Troy Marshall, director of commercial industry relations, American Angus Association   GUESTS: Ryan Noble, Noble Ranch; and Jordan Willis, Willis Ranch GUEST BIOS:   Jordan Willis, along with his wife, Jennie, and their four children, own and operate Willis Ranch near Cokeville, Wyo., alongside the rest of his extended family. Today, 24 pivots cover nearly 3,700 acres of flood-irrigated soil with 1,800 commercial cows surrounding it. Willis Ranch is a diversified operation, committed to producing top-tier commercial Angus cattle, collecting detailed data, irrigating and farming their native lands, and keeping their family ties strong.   Ryan Noble, Yuma, Colo., ranches with his wife, Ronella, and their two children, along with Ryan’s parents on the place that’s been in the family for more than a century. After college, Ryan found a way to stretch their eastern Colorado ranch to support two families and continued growing that Angus-based cow herd each year. An innovative “always getting better” mindset, along with a focus on cattle that do it all on the ranch and on the rail earned the family the 2019 Commercial Commitment to Excellence Award. Drought has changed their “how,” but not their “why,” and today they operate successful heifer development program. Related Reading:   Register for Angus Convention: https://angusconvention.com/  The Way to Do It https://www.angusjournal.com/ArticlePDF/1019-CAB-commercial.pdf  Legacies for a Living http://www.angusjournal.com/articlepdf/0218-cab-willis.pdf  Healthy Hearts Start with Knowing More https://www.angusjournal.net/post/healthy-heart-starts-with-knowing-more  The Link to Profitability   http://www.angusbeefbulletin.com/extra/2020/05may20/0420fp-B-ABB-Willis.html  The No Judgement Zone https://www.angusbeefbulletin.com/extra/2022/08aug22/0722mk_B_TheLink.html    Don't miss news in the Angus breed. Visit www.AngusJournal.net and subscribe to the AJ Daily e-newsletter and our monthly magazine, the Angus Journal.

October 4 • 1h 3m 39s
A Good Bull vs. a Great Bull and Other Insight from Jarold Callahan cover art

A Good Bull vs. a Great Bull and Other Insight from Jarold Callahan

With more than four decades of experience in the cattle business, Jarold Callahan has a pretty good idea of what he expects of seedstock breeder, himself included.  In this episode, the president of Express Ranches shares his breeding approach for serving a wide variety of customers. He talks the show ring versus the commercial customer, genomic technology and the recent trends in semen sales.  He discusses the difference between the “good” Angus bulls and the “great” ones.  “If you sell cattle that do the job that they were intended to do and don't cause them problems, they become an asset,” he says. “If they cause them problems of any kind, they tend to be a liability, and [customers will] go somewhere else and buy them.” HOSTS: Mark McCully and Miranda Reiman  GUEST: Jarold Callahan, president, Express Ranches Jarold Callahan was born on a farm and ranch in Welch, Okla., and graduated one of the top 10 students in the College of Agriculture at Oklahoma State University. Upon graduation, he was an instructor at Northeast Oklahoma A&M, and while at NEO, he received his master’s degree in agriculture from the University of Arkansas. In 1981, he joined the faculty at Oklahoma State University and was an assistant professor in the animal science department, was in charge of the purebred beef herds and coached the livestock judging teams. In 1991, Callahan became the executive vice president of the Oklahoma Cattlemen's Association, and in 1996, he joined Express Ranches initially as chief operations officer and then became president. Callahan was elected to the American Angus Association board of directors in 2005 and served as president in 2011 to 2012. Related reading: The Pursuit of Excellence https://www.angusjournal.net/post/the-pursuit-of-excellence Express Yourself http://www.angusjournal.com/articlepdf/0320-express.pdf Forging Trails https://www.angusjournal.com/ArticlePDF/Forging%20Trails_Pres%20Pers%2011.12.pdf Phenotypic Data in a Genomic World https://www.angusjournal.net/post/phenotypic-data-in-a-genomic-world Diving Into the Data | Angus University Webinar https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oxXCr5KCg5c Don't miss news in the Angus breed. Visit www.AngusJournal.net and subscribe to the AJ Daily e-newsletter and our monthly magazine, the Angus Journal.

September 20 • 1h 10m 20s
From Data Submission to Depreciation: September ’22 Board Highlights cover art

From Data Submission to Depreciation: September ’22 Board Highlights

When the Board of Directors comes into the American Angus Association office, it’s a week full of productive meetings and extra energy all around. This episode gives a behind-the-scenes peek at some of the high-level conversations the 17 breeders from across the United States had in St. Joseph, Mo.  From the growing value differentiation in feeder calves to data submission and the role of Angus Genetics Inc., they covered a lot of ground.  Guests Jim Brinkley, Brinkley Angus Ranch; Jerry Connealy, Connealy Angus Ranch; and Alan Miller, Prairie View Farms; join hosts Mark McCully and Miranda Reiman to provide the recap.  HOSTS: Mark McCully and Miranda Reiman  GUESTS: Jim Brinkley, Brinkley Angus Ranch; Jerry Connealy, Connealy Angus Ranch; and Alan Miller, Prairie View Farms GUEST BIOS: Jim Brinkley was born and raised in northern Missouri on his family’s farming operation. Today, the family’s diversified farming operation near Milan is made up of more than 1,300 acres and 400 registered Angus cows. Brinkley has hosted Brinkley Angus-influence feeder-calf sales and often places customer cattle into feeding programs where their calves are rewarded for the added value bred into the bulls that sired the calves. Brinkley is serving as Chairman of the Commercial Programs committee. Jerry Connealy is a fifth-generation cattleman who has operated the family ranch near Whitman, Neb., since 1981 with his wife, Sharon. The Connealys have three sons, Jed, Gabriel and Ben; as well as a daughter, Hannah, and can often be found with grandkids close by. Jerry focuses his cow herd base on productivity traits and manages two bull sales per year, selling 300 bulls at each. Connealy is the current Association president.  Alan Miller, Gridley, Ill., is a third-generation Angus breeder. His grandfather, Adam Schlipf, began an Angus cattle herd in the late 1940s and was active in the purebred Angus business through the 1960s. Forty years ago, Miller’s parents, Orlan and Carol Miller, began revitalizing the Angus herd and named the operation Prairie View Farms (PVF). PVF is a family operation that Alan and his wife, Theresa, operate in close cooperation with brother-in-law and sister Brandon and Cathy Jones. Miller is serving as Angus Genetics Inc., (AGI) chairman. Related reading:  Letter from the President: https://www.angus.org/pub/LetterFromPresidentSept2022.pdf Phenotypic Data in a Genomic World: https://www.angusjournal.net/post/phenotypic-data-in-a-genomic-world Reputation Verified: https://www.angusjournal.net/post/reputation-verified   Don't miss news in the Angus breed. Visit www.AngusJournal.net and subscribe to the AJ Daily e-newsletter and our monthly magazine, the Angus Journal.

September 16 • 39m 23s
The Heritage of Change: Rishel and Patterson Talk the Then and Now cover art

The Heritage of Change: Rishel and Patterson Talk the Then and Now

Change can be exciting and fun, or it can be hard and messy. It can take work and brain power, but it can move you toward better cattle and more profit. That’s what has always motivated longtime Angus breeder Bill Rishel to invite innovation. “This change thing, the worst thing anybody can ever do is be afraid of it,” Bill says.  Listen as Bill and his friend and fellow breeder Larry Patterson talk about the developments they’ve seen in their lifetime. This episode goes from loading cattle on railcars to GPS collars for cows, with plenty of Angus breed improvement in between.    Mentioned in this episode: CAB at 30: http://www.angusjournal.com/articlepdf/cab%20history%2011_08%20aj.pdf Don't miss news in the Angus breed. Visit www.AngusJournal.net and subscribe to the AJ Daily e-newsletter and our monthly magazine, the Angus Journal.

September 6 • 1h 17m 52s
From the Dining Room to the Board Room: Dal Porto and Connealy Discuss Decisions cover art

From the Dining Room to the Board Room: Dal Porto and Connealy Discuss Decisions

HOSTS: Mark McCully and Miranda Reiman  GUESTS: Jerry Connealy, Connealy Angus Ranch;  and David Dal Porto, Dal Porto Livestock  Decisions, especially in the cattle business, have a way of sticking around for a while; their influence felt long after they’re made.  Dining room table discussions often turn into the strategy that shape Angus herds across the United States. This episode features two well-known Angus breeders to get at how they approach the things both at home and while conducting business on behalf of the American Angus Association.  We talk labor shortages, breeding philosophies, hard conversations and more.   Some items mentioned in the episode: American Angus Association Board contact information: https://www.angus.org/assoc/board  Bovine Congestive Heart Failure: https://www.angusjournal.net/post/healthy-heart-starts-with-knowing-more Guest bios: Jerry Connealy is a fifth-generation cattleman who has operated the family ranch since 1981 with his wife, Sharon. The Connealys have three sons, Jed, Gabriel and Ben; as well as a daughter, Hannah, and can often be found with grandkids close by. Jerry focuses his cow herd base on productivity traits and manages two bull sales per year, selling 300 bulls at each.   David Dal Porto and his wife, Jeanene, manage their registered and commercial Angus operation in California and now also in Anselmo, Neb. They have three children — Lindsey, AJ and Dawson. David has firsthand experience at every level in the evolution and application of performance information and complements that knowledge with a management background developed from experience. Dal Porto and his bull sale partner, David Medeiros, earned the 2011 Certified Angus Beef® (CAB) Seedstock Commitment to Excellence Award. Don't miss news in the Angus breed. Visit www.AngusJournal.net and subscribe to the AJ Daily e-newsletter and our monthly magazine, the Angus Journal.

August 23 • 1h 8m 5s
Join the Angus Conversation cover art

Join the Angus Conversation

Be part of the latest discussions in the Angus breed. Hear different perspectives from fellow breeders, researchers marketers and more. Join co-hosts Mark McCully, Brett Spader and Miranda Reiman in this pre-episode. It’s “get to know your hosts” with podcast goals and some future of the Angus breed thrown in, too. Don't miss news in the Angus breed. Visit www.AngusJournal.net and subscribe to the AJ Daily e-newsletter and our monthly magazine, the Angus Journal.

August 19 • 51m 38s
Coming Soon: The Angus Conversation cover art

Coming Soon: The Angus Conversation

Join us for “The Angus Conversation,” a new podcast by the Angus Journal team. Listen every other week as we bring you new episodes with dynamic topics and keep you informed on all things Angus.  Subscribe anywhere you listen to podcasts, or visit AngusJournal.net.  Don't miss news in the Angus breed. Visit www.AngusJournal.net and subscribe to the AJ Daily e-newsletter and our monthly magazine, the Angus Journal.

August 17 • 47s
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